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Dead Silver Birch Tree

Dead Silver Birch Tree

This week we have been working on felling (taking down) a dying Silver Birch Tree which of course poses dangers as it is located over a public car park belonging to an NHS building.  Of course the NHS and their team contacted us as soon as there were any signs of it dying and had us inspect the tree.

Due to its height and the fact that it was dying posed health and safety risks for our climbers. They were unable to climb the tree without the use of a crane (Cherry Picker).  These are hired out by us to use on jobs such as the one we are telling you about today.

Simple to use you think, but not.  Equipment like this and jobs like the one we have carried out take professional and experienced arborists to carry the works out, operate the equipment and oversee the job in hand.  In today’s market competition with quoting is at its highest, and though we always aim to be competitive, you get what you pay for.  A friendly and professional team, experienced arborists, fully insured company and great customer service.

We often carry out works for local councils and worked on many jobs given to us my NHS management.   If you feel you may have a tree that is in decline and would like a free heath check which a member of our team can carry out.  Or if you wish for a consultant to visit which we can arrange at a cost please feel free to contact us on 07966 265 373 or drop us an email  for a response within 24 hours.

                             

Do not forget this months promotion of 10% discount, if you quote this reference at the time of making your enquiry : JJB10

We look forward to hearing from you. 

 

 

Dead Silver Birch Tree

Dead Silver Birch Tree

This week we have been working on felling (taking down) a dying Silver Birch Tree which of course poses dangers as it is located over a public car park belonging to an NHS building.  Of course the NHS and their team contacted us as soon as there were any signs of it dying and had us inspect the tree.

Due to its height and the fact that it was dying posed health and safety risks for our climbers. They were unable to climb the tree without the use of a crane (Cherry Picker).  These are hired out by us to use on jobs such as the one we are telling you about today.

Simple to use you think, but not.  Equipment like this and jobs like the one we have carried out take professional and experienced arborists to carry the works out, operate the equipment and oversee the job in hand.  In today’s market competition with quoting is at its highest, and though we always aim to be competitive, you get what you pay for.  A friendly and professional team, experienced arborists, fully insured company and great customer service.

We often carry out works for local councils and worked on many jobs given to us my NHS management.   If you feel you may have a tree that is in decline and would like a free heath check which a member of our team can carry out.  Or if you wish for a consultant to visit which we can arrange at a cost please feel free to contact us on 07966 265 373 or drop us an email  for a response within 24 hours.

                             

Do not forget this months promotion of 10% discount, if you quote this reference at the time of making your enquiry : JJB10

We look forward to hearing from you. 

 

 

Silver Birch Tree

Saving this beautiful Silver Birch Tree

 

Earlier last week JJ&B attended a property in Petts Wood, which at the front of this garden houses a stunning Silver Birch Tree.  Unfortuantely Ivy had been growing up the trunk of the tree and preventing the tree from receiving it’s nutrients needed from the soil.  Along with our recommendation our customer agreed for the Ivy to be removed in attempt to save the tree.

 

Heres some more on Ivy…

What is it?

Ivy is a woody stemmed, self-clinging climber that can grow quickly to cover fences, walls and buildings. It is a cause for concern owing to its rapid pace of growth and worries about potential damage to the support structure.

Appearance

Ivy is recognised by its dense, evergreen foliage. In its climbing state it has three- to five-lobed glossy leaves.

It attaches itself to supports by producing aerial roots along the stems. When the stems are pulled away from the wall, they often leave behind the unsightly root ends, that persist and can often only be removed with wire brushes or pressure washing.

The problem

Self-clinging climbers such as Boston ivy and Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus sp.) do not usually cause damage to wall surfaces, but common or English ivy (Hedera helix sp.) supports itself by aerial roots and where these penetrate cracks or joints they may cause structural damage. Sound masonry is unaffected.

Its dense cover can hide defects in the fabric of the building and hinder maintenance work. Ivy may also provide access for intruders and harbour pests such as mice.

Where brickwork is sound, the main problem is to keep growth away from gutters and paint work.

It has been suggested that vegetation attached to walls could lead to dampness resulting from slower drying conditions following rain. This may be plausible on a south-west facing wall where the rain is driven by prevailing winds. However, other sources suggest that such plants will have a slight drying effect on mortar and will also provide some degree of insulation in winter, particularly evergreen ivies covering exposed north and east-facing walls.

Large climbers can pose a risk to buildings. Such problems are most likely with older property, those with shallow foundations and those built on clay soils.

 

If you have Ivy growing in an unwanted area, or need to bring some control to your Ivy feel free to get in contact for a free quotation either by email or by calling 0800 072 7755